Grow Your Hair Back: The Ultimate Guide to Hair Care and Hair Loss Treatment and Prevention

hair loss cure

Introduction

There's nothing truer than the saying, "Our hair is our crowning glory" - and this goes for both genders.

Hair grooming, but more importantly, having a head-full of hair is as important to men as it is to women. To women, it may be an important accessory of beauty, and for men, it adds to a sense of manliness, enhances their looks and makes them more appealing and attractive to women. Balding to men is associated with aging (only old men are expected to lose hair) and therefore, having hair on one's head is a sign of virility and masculinity.

It's for this reason that grocery stores have shelves stocked full with hair care and hair grooming products of all forms and kinds, for different purposes, and even specialized and customized for use of men and women. In one study, it was found that more than half of the men in the UK use about six to ten hair grooming products alone, from the staple shampoos and conditioners to hair gels and other styling products.

It's mainly vanity, but we have to admit that having a full mop of hair makes up a significant part of who we are. Our hair identifies us - "He's the one with the short-cropped hair." Having a head-full of hair is almost synonymous to having a complete pair of arms and legs.

So for most people, the loss of hair can be a difficult experience. While it is a known fact that hair loss is an inevitable part of life - hair production slows down as we age - no one wants to be saddled with early baldness when you're only in the prime of your life.

We've heard it all before: clients waking up one day in shock after discovering a coin-sized bald spot on their heads; women agonizing over the strands of hair they see on the shower floor; men looking for topical creams and shampoos to prevent the early onset of balding. Even more are tales of men and women on the search for the perfect wig or toupee to cover up the loss of their hair as a result of medication for a chronic illness.

Hair may be all about vanity but hair conditions, such as hair loss and balding may have emotional, mental and psychological repercussions: insecurity, the loss of self-confidence, humiliation or embarrassment, self-imposed isolation out of fear of what people might think of how we look with that missing part of ourselves. Hair issues are more than vanity.

But here's one thing that most people miss when they talk about hair loss: It's part of the natural process of the hair growth cycle. Shedding hair is normal, and losing hair as we age is normal. However, there are instances when we are shedding hair at an abnormally faster rate than usual - and this is something that we have to pay attention to. It's also perfectly understandable and acceptable that some people would like to reverse the hair loss that comes as part of the aging process.

That said, hair loss isn't as bad or as hopeless as it sounds. It shouldn't be cause for added personal stress or social stigma, nor should it be something that should make us feel more self-conscious and less confident as individuals. With the advances in technology, you don't have to be saddled anymore with the uncomfortable choice of wearing an ill-fitting, unnatural-looking hairpiece. There is now a wide array of options available to treat and cure hair loss, whether temporary or permanent.

But before diving deep into what these are, we'll talk a bit first about some of the basics, including the science behind hair and the most important of all, the causes and types of hair loss conditions. Depending on the causes and types, you'll be able to find the right cure and treatment for you.

The Science behind Hair

You might think, "It's just hair", but think about this: What would you do if you wake up one day without a single strand of hair on your head? However, as we've mentioned, hair loss is a natural physiological process. In the hair growth cycle, old hair has to be shed in order for new hair to grow. As we age, our body's capacity to produce hair also slows down similar to when our bones stop growing at a certain point in our lives.

To better understand hair loss, let's begin by talking about the science behind hair. How does the hair cycle works?

Hair anatomy simplified

Our hair is part of what we call the integumentary system of the human body, which also includes the skin and nails. Hair is, in fact, a type of modified skin. It is made up of keratin, a form of protein, and is produced in tunnel-like structures in the skin called follicles. Inside the hair follicle is the hair bulb that is comprised of cells that deposit keratin and melanin, which is responsible for giving your hair its color. The hair that breaks through your skin from the follicle is the hair shaft. The shaft is basically composed of dead cells comprised of keratin fibres. In fact, the totality of hair on our head is a huge lump of dead cells, which explains why we don't experience any pain when we go for a haircut.

How hair grows

The hair cycle is made up of four stages: anagen, catagen, telogen and exogen, and different hair strands may be at different stages of growth at one time.

Anagen is the growth phase. This lasts for about 3 - 5 years where you can observe your hair growing every half an inch every month. Full-length hair from this phase is about 18 - 30 inches long. Studies show that this phase may also be affected by other factors. Asian hair, for example, has been found to have a longer anagen phase. Weather is also a factor; hair growth can be faster in summer than in winter.

Catagen is the regression phase and serves as the transition to shedding. During this time, the hair follicle slowly detaches itself from the papilla, which contains the very tiny blood vessels that nourish the cell. The loss of nourishment means that the hair also stops growing. This phase lasts for about 10 days.

The third and fourth stages are known as telogen and exogen, respectively. In telogen, the hair is supposed to be at "rest" until it finally detaches itself from the follicle and enters the exogen or shedding stage. Once the hair is detached from the follicle, the follicle remains inactive for about three months after which a new cycle begins again.

Hair follicles on our head are at various stages of this hair growth cycle, so that while some hair follicles are in the last stages, others are just beginning their anagen phase, while others still are in the middle of the hair growth cycle. It's because of these varying stages of growth that our hair doesn't fall out all at once. Instead, you only shed about 50 - 100 strands a day - this is the normal rate of shedding hair.

Generally, hair problems especially hair thinning and hair loss occur around the anagen phase or the resting phase. As we age, the length of the anagen phase also decreases as the hair follicles receive less and less nourishment from the body. The result is hair that is weaker and thinner after every cycle. In some cases, the hair enters the resting phase too early (or the catagen phase is too short) and this is when excessive shedding also happens.

Disruptions in the normal length of each phase, which can cause hair loss and hair thinning, may be the result of a number of internal and external stimuli. These are also what we call the triggers and causes of your hair loss. As a quick example, dieting can leave the body stressed and in need of important nutrients. Because of this stress, hair growth may be cut shorter than usual and there is an early onset of telogen or shedding of hair.

Some fast facts about hair and hair growth

Understanding Hair Loss

When we say "hair loss", it generally refers to any of these things: balding, hair thinning, excessive hair fall, or total loss of hair. They may sound and mean all the same thing - the loss of hair, but there are different kinds of hair loss conditions depending on the nature of the problem and what's causing them.

Types of hair loss

Let's take a quick look at the major types of hair loss.

Major causes of hair loss

While some conditions are medically-related, others are caused by more natural or artificial factors. And unknown to most of us, many of these things can either serve as the trigger that will cause us to start losing our hair, or the factor that can aggravate or worsen your already-existing condition.

Food. Hair growth is dependent on nutrients that the body possesses much like most psychological functions, so the absence of certain nutrients as well as the excess or oversupply of some can affect the hair growth cycle.

A diet that is poor or lacking in certain nutrients, particularly iron, protein, and vitamin B, which are essential in the production of keratin, can cause a long telogen phase and a very short anagen stage. On the other hand, excess supply of vitamin A in the body, especially those taken through supplements, can prove to be toxic and can cause a range of adverse body effects including loss of appetite, fatigue and consequently, hair loss.

Certain foods have also been found to aggravate or worsen hair fall, such as sugar that triggers the overproduction of the male hormone, androgen, which in turn causes the hair follicles to shrink in size and for hair to fall out or stop growing. Fish products that are known to contain high levels of mercury like tuna, mackerel and swordfish can also cause hair weakening and excessive hair fall. Studies have also found that fried foods are associated with the production of high levels of DHT.

Bodily activity. Stress caused by physical or emotional trauma, such as surgery or psychological stress can take the toll on the body and can manifest in negative effects including hair fall. Diet regimens that result into sudden weight loss can also cause physiological trauma that can lead to hair shedding and thinning.

However, stress-related hair loss is most common in women than in men, and is more a temporary than a permanent case of hair loss. In such cases where the body is subjected to extreme stress, hair fall happens with 3 week to 6 months after the event.

Medical conditions and medications. A common medical condition that also causes hair loss is hypothyroidism, which can happen in both men and women. Patients suffer from an underactive thyroid gland, which is responsible for producing the hormone, thyroxin that performs important bodily functions, such as the regulation of body temperature, proper utilization of carbohydrates and fats, and production of protein. Since protein is an important nutrient for the production of keratin, inadequate protein supply in the body due to an underactive thyroid means that hair growth in the follicles is slow. In men specially, hair loss is one of the first signs of hypothyroidism.

Those taking medication for high blood pressure, such as blood thinners, and for depression may also experience temporary hair loss.

Chemotherapy is also one of the primary causes of balding among cancer patients, men and women alike. While not all chemotherapy treatments result into hair loss, some that involves the use of drugs like Altretamine, Carboplatin, Docetaxel, and Idarubicin can cause hair thinning and hair fall. In such cases, the hair loss varies from person to person and the dosage of drugs administered. Hair fall doesn't occur at once, but rather after several weeks of treatment until hair fall rate increases after one or two months of exposure to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy as part of cancer treatment can also result into hair loss but typically only on areas where the radiation is targeted.

Hair practices. Our hair is one of the strongest and most elastic parts of our body. One strand of a healthy hair can be twice as strong as a copper wire of similar thickness. However, not all hair types are equal. Unfortunately, hair care practices and styling can lead to scalp damage and unnecessary pressure on the hair follicles, resulting into hair breakage and loss.

Natural hair that is subjected to constant physical trauma from excessive brushing or combing, tight braids or ponytails, or extreme scratching or massage can cause hair at the temples to become weak and to stop growing to its normal length. Clean shaving, especially for men, can cause white bumps to appear on the area where the hair was shaved short, and at times can become infected with puss and leave permanent scarring, affecting hair growth.

Hair styling products from shampoo, conditioner, to hair dye, bleach, gels and perm and straightening products may contain chemicals that can damage the scalp and cause the shaft to break, resulting into hair thinning. Beware of these products that contain toxic chemicals such as arsenic, thallium, meadow saffron (colchicum autumnale), and lead. These chemical ingredients can manipulate and disrupt the natural hair growth cycle, for example, shortening the anagen phase of growth. Hair procedures like hair relaxing and permanent waving, while it does not lead to permanent hair loss, can damage the quality of the hair and make it more prone to hair breakage.

The Lowdown on Hair Loss and Treatment

Can I grow my hair back? The answer, of course, is YES.

In fact, hair loss cures and treatments are a dime a dozen. There are cures that are designed for temporary hair loss conditions, and others more are available for permanent cases. It's also important to note that some of these cures are specific to the cause and the type of hair loss, and other treatments don't apply for other cases such as pattern balding. We've listed them all the same in order to give you a good idea of the breadth of choices available.

These cures are grouped into three types: medications for hair loss, cosmetic and surgical treatments, and natural cures. Most, if not all, of these are designed to slow down the shedding of your hair, promote growth, and in some cases, hide hair loss.

Medications for hair loss

Minoxidil (Rogaine). Minoxidil is one of the most common and popular forms of medication for hair loss, particularly pattern baldness but also generally used in cases of alopecia areata. It is an over-the-counter drug that comes in either liquid or foam form and applied on the scalp, particularly on the bald patches to promote hair growth and stop further hair loss.

Minoxidil typically comes in 2% and 5% dosage. With the former, hair growth is not visible up until the fourth month (16 weeks) of use, but it could be faster with the 5% dosage.This is most effective especially if you haven't been bald for more than 5 years, your bald patches are less than 10cm across, and most of all, if the bald spots still have some tiny, fine hairs. Studies found that people who have used minoxidil have observed at least minimal to moderate hair growth. The new hair is typically downy soft, but with continued use, it will grow in thickness as the rest of the hair.

Take note, however, that this is not a permanent cure. Once the medication is stopped, the follicles go back to what they were before treatment. Also, it doesn't work for all cases of pattern baldness - only about 35% of men have indicated noticeable growth. Doctors suggest that the use of the drug be stopped if there is no regrowth in one year.

While the drug is generally safe for use, some possible side effects are mild irritation of the scalp, dryness and growth of hair on some parts of the body especially the sides of the face and hands. In some cases, you might observe some increased hair loss around the first few days of use. If the hair fall continues after two weeks upon application of minoxidil, stop the treatment first and see a doctor.

Finasteride (Propecia). The drug is recommended for male use only, and is in pill form. The drug basically slows down hair loss, while promoting gradual hair growth. The drugs works by stopping the enzyme, type II 5-alpha reductas, which is known to produce DHT. The dosage is one pill a day, and has been found to be effective on 80% of men. Like minoxidil, it works best if the bald patches still have tiny, fine hairs. Results are visible within six to three months, and studies of those who have continued its use for two years show longer, thicker hair than those who used it for only for a short time.

It is generally safe, although some noted side effects are decrease in sexual drive and some temporary impotence that eventually lessens with long-term use of the drug. Women are strictly prohibited from taking finasteride or touching the tablets as studies have found that it can lead to the feminization of a male fetus during pregnancy.

Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are another form of medication used to treat alopecia areata. Since the hair loss is caused by an autoimmune disease, the steroid works by stopping the immune system from attacking the hair follicles, and therefore triggering hair growth.

Liquid coricosteroids are injected into the scalp every four to six weeks and is used for treating small patches of baldness. It can be painful and uncomfortable, and while it is effective, there have been some studies that have found that one of its long-term side effects is premature balding.

Corticosteroid creams and ointments are also available, and are applied directly on the area in the scalp where there is patchy baldness. The common forms of topical steroids are betamethasone, hydrocortisone, and mometasone. Some possible side effects include thinning and dryness of the skin and noticeable acne production.

Oral or tablet steroids are also available, but they are not generally prescribed because of known side effects such as diabetes and ulcers.

Contact immunotherapy. Another drug that can be administered for cases of alopecia areata is contact immunotherapy and is recommended for severe cases. Diphenylcyclopropenon (DPCP) is applied on the scalp every week, and the dosage of the drug is increased over time until a mild allergic reaction is observed, which signals that the drug is taking effect. Regrowth may be observed within three months from the beginning of treatment.

While it is generally safe like minoxidil and finasteride, noticeable side effects are skin rashes (contact dermatitis) and swollen lymph nodes in the neck area.

Thyroid medication. Hair loss as a result of thyroid problems will only be solved by treating the root cause. This means that you need to take medications for hypothyroidism in order to address the hormonal imbalance in the body. The most common medication for thyroid problems is levothyroxine, a synthetic version of thyroxine (thyroid hormone). Since the medication is used to address the thyroid problem and hair loss indirectly, the medication has to be continued even when you've gotten better or your hormone level has gone back to normal in order to continue hair growth.

However, be on the lookout for signs that indicate that you might be getting too much thyroid hormone, such as shakiness, a general feeling of restlessness, heart palpitations, and excessive sweating. Overdose of thyroid hormone can lead to osteoporosis and heart attack.

Cosmetic and surgical treatments

Hair transplant/surgery. A hair transplant or surgery is the quickest treatment for permanent cases of hair loss, although the most expensive. In pattern baldness, for example, where the top of the head is the most affected area, a hair transplant allows the surgeon to use existing hair to implant it into the bald sections of the head. It works by removing a graft or follicular sample in parts of the head that still have hair (usually this is the back of the head as this area is most resistant to hormonal changes), and placing this graft in the areas that are bald.

There are different types of hair transplant procedures depending on how the graft is extracted or removed:

Laser treatments. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is used for the prevention and reversal of hair loss. Also known as red light therapy, cold laser, and soft laser, it is a form of light/heat treatment (therefore generally safer) that is used on cases of pattern baldness and alopecia areata. The procedure uses a device that emits light that penetrates into the scalp. The more commonly used lasers are the excimer, helium-neon and fractional erbium-glass. The procedure can increase the blood flow in the scalp to stimulate the follicles that are in resting or dormant phase to go into anagen, and at the same time, prevent the production of DHT, which destroys the hair follicles.

Laser therapy is available in salons and administered by a hair professional who has been trained in the procedure. Treatment is usually two to three times a week. Generally, each session involves a short 8-15 minute exposure of the scalp to the laser device. There is generally no prescribed period of time that the treatment should be administered, although the more frequent and longer the duration, the more effective results have been observed. Noticeable hair growth can be observed after 12 to 26 weeks of treatment. The LLLT is also prescribed as a complementary treatment in post-operative hair surgery.

Two of the most common LLLT products in the market are the Hairmax Lasercomb and the Capillus 272. The Lasercomb is a hand-held device that is used to comb the hair for 10-15 minutes every treatment, and takes about eight weeks of use in order to see a noticeable improvement in the thickness and quality of the hair. The Capillus is a laser cap that must be worn, and is more convenient because this can be used at home or even out in public (it can be worn underneath a cap or a turban).

While some medical practitioners are still on the fence about the effectiveness of laser treatments, studies have found that hair growth using laser therapy increased by 19 normal-size hairs per square centimetre. The regrowth is also observed as thicker, shinier and more manageable. It's a non-invasive, painless procedure that works for both men and women. However, the LLLT is not a stand-alone cure and is thus used in combination with other treatments.

Platelet rich plasma therapy. This is a complementary treatment recommended during a hair transplant. Platelet rich plasma has growth components and proteins that promote and aid in healing. PRP is used to stimulate growth as it reverses the shrinking of the follicles that is common in pattern baldness.

Scalp reduction. As the name suggests, the procedure involves cutting away portions of the scalp that are bald. This is recommended for those with well-defined bald spots on the crown of the head. The procedure is used to reduce the size of the bald spots, and can also be employed as part of a hair surgery.

A scalp reduction procedure can be much more painful than a hair transplant. You may experience headaches right after the procedure, and scalp tightness for a couple of months.

Tissue expansion. In this procedure, a material called tissue expander is inserted under portions of the scalp with hair. Saline water is injected for six to eight weeks in order to expand or stretch this portion of hair-bearing skin. The bags are eventually removed and the expanded hair-bearing skin is cut away and moved to the adjacent bald area. This is typically used to address hair loss as a result of burns or injuries on the scalp.

Hair multiplication. Similar to the idea of cloning, this treatment involves taking out donor cells from the hair follicles and then growing and multiplying them in a laboratory. Once sufficient samples have been multiplied, these hair cells are then injected into the bald patches to stimulate hair growth. As a relatively new treatment, hair cloning is still in its research phase.

Hair concealers and hair fibers. These are one of the newest cosmetic answers to hair loss. As the name suggests, these products are applied on the scalp or hair to camouflage hair loss and give the appearance of fullness to thinning hair. Some of these are applied directly on the scalp, while others (hair fibers) are attached to the hair, much like hair extensions, to add volume.

This is a short-term cure, applied while waiting for hair to grow, and therefore recommended for those with mild to medium case of hair loss. In addition to being non-invasive, hair concealers and hair fibers are instant and affordable. Like wigs and hairpieces, they are used to effectively cover up balding spots while not getting in the way of growing hair. Compared to wigs, however, they are more natural looking and blend well with your natural hair, therefore drawing less attention when you're out in public.

Here are some pointers and reminders in using hair concealers and hair fibers:

Hair pieces and wigs. One of the most traditional answers to hair loss, wigs and toupees are perfect for severe cases where full coverage is needed. Wigs can be made either from real human hair, animal hair or synthetic fiber. The materials are sewn together into certain hair styles and are worn on top of the real hair. For those who want to cover up only bald spots or add volume to thinning hair, hair pieces and hair extensions are also available. These are balls of hair that can be attached at the base or clipped to portions of the head.

While wigs are the cheapest and quickest way to cover up hair loss, there is a tendency for these to look unnatural and uncomfortable. Here are some reminders on picking out and using the right wig for you:

Hair spa. A hair spa treatment is one of the most convenient, non-invasive, not to mention, most rejuvenating ways to treat hair loss and promote healthy hair growth. Besides hair loss, it has also been known to address other hair issues like dandruff, split ends, and dry and damaged hair. There are many forms of hair spa treatment depending on what's offered at the salon, but it generally includes an oil massage of the scalp, shampoo and deep conditioning. The whole process helps in blood circulation, bringing the needed nutrients to the follicles, and activates the glands to produce oil.

Natural cures

Massage with natural ingredients. A good head massage can increase the blood flow to the follicles to help in the absorption of nutrients needed for your hair to grow. Using these kitchen ingredients and essential oils on your head can help in repairing damaged follicles, treating scalp infections and disorders, and stimulating hair growth.

Eat the right foods. Hair production relies on the nutrients contained in the bloodstream, therefore the right diet matters in preventing hair loss and promoting the growth of hair in the follicles. Eat foods that contain the following nutrients:

On the other hand, avoid these foods:

Take in natural supplements. If you aren't getting enough nutrients from the foods you eat, you can also try taking natural supplements to address your nutritional deficiencies. Multivitamins that especially contain vitamins A, C, and the B-complex vitamins can be taken once a day. Fish oil capsules that contain omega-3 fatty acids are also recommended.

Studies have also found that bone broth is a good source of protein, iron, collagen, glucosamine and other minerals that can promote healthy hair, skin and nails. If you can't find bone broth, there are bone broth protein powders that are available.

Observe proper hair care practices. The right hair care practices promote a healthy hair growth at the same time as it reduces and prevents hair damage such as breakage. Washing your hair with a mild, preferably natural, shampoo and conditioner with biotin should be an important part of your hair care routine. Go for cool showers instead because hot water can dehydrate your hair strands and lead to dry, thin hair that is easy to break. Lower temperature can help lock in moisture. Limit the use of the blow-dryer.

Also, contrary to people's belief that a 100 brush strokes a day can make your hair shiny and long, too much and too frequent brushing and combing can actually exert unnecessary pressure on the follicles, causing it to loosen its grip on the hair shaft, eventually resulting into hair fall. While regular combing is needed in order to encourage blood flow into the follicles, do so only when you need to style your hair like in the morning. Use a wide-tooth comb as it allows for less tugging and pulling when you brush especially when dealing with tangles. If tangles become unmanageable, use a moisturizing shampoo to loosen them.

There seems to be some contention over whether hair products like hair sprays, hair gels and serums can lead to hair loss. What's true though is that frequent use of these products can damage your hair, either make them thinner or more prone to breakage. Limit the use of these products for those occasions when you absolutely need to. If you used hair products with harsh chemicals especially hair sprays, wash your hair at night with a mild shampoo to get rid of the chemicals.

Try balayam yoga. Balayam yoga (also called balam yoga) is an ancient acupressure exercise associated with hair growth. It comes from the Hindu words, Bal, which means hair, and Vyayam meaning exercise. The exercise involves rubbing the fingernails on both hands together to stimulate activity in the scalp. It has been known to help cure pattern baldness in men and women if done correctly and frequently over a long period of time.

To do the exercise, simply rub the fingernails of both hands - except the thumbs - against each other as hard as possible. Make sure not to let the surface of the nails rub against each other - just the tips. In acupressure therapy, it is believed that the hair follicles on the scalp are connected to the fingernails and by doing the exercise, it will stimulate blood circulation and nutrients into the follicles, therefore promoting hair growth.

Do the exercise for 10 minutes twice a day - before breakfast in the morning and before dinner at night. Complement with the right foods rich in protein and iron. Results are visible within three to six months.

Do not try this if you have high blood pressure as it can worsen your condition. The balam yoga also works only for those with pattern baldness and not other types of hair loss.

Again, as we've mentioned at the start, these treatments and cures are dependent on the cause and type of hair loss. While massage oils and a hair spa treatment can work on hair loss in men caused by a skin or scalp infection, these may not work for cases of pattern baldness that are hereditary or caused by DHT associated with male hormones. Even medications like minodixil and finasteride cannot offer a permanent cure. In cases of permanent hair loss like pattern baldness, sometimes the best type of cure is simply management of your condition.

Managing Hair Loss and Overall Hair Care

Managing hair loss is just as important as treating it. Now that we've talked about the different treatment options and cures available to reverse hair loss and promote increased growth, let's talk about how you can manage your condition and at the same time prevent further hair loss. The first is more psychological, while the second is more practical.

Managing hair loss as a result of medication (chemotherapy)

Dealing and coping with hair loss is a particularly important issue especially for those who lost (or continue to lose) their hair because of cancer and other chronic conditions that require chemotherapy or radiation therapy. It can be a particularly trying time, and there are instances when the depression settles in that the patient is unable to even consider or think about hair loss options and cures.

So, here are some pointers on how to better cope and deal with hair loss while you wait for your hair to grow back.

For others whose hair loss is due to other, non-medical conditions, here are some pointers:

Preventing further hair loss

When you're investing considerable time and money on a mix of hair treatments and cures, the last things you should be doing are those that will only aggravate your condition. Likewise, when your hair has finally grown back, the last thing you would want is for you to go through another horrific episode of hair loss. Preventing further - or another case of hair loss, and stopping it before it actually happens should be your goal.

In addition to the hair care practices we've listed earlier to help stimulate hair growth, here are other more tips to ensure that you grow hair that is more resistant to shedding, breakage and other damages.

Hair loss is not a hopeless condition. While there are certainly cases of permanent hair loss in men, there are still cases when it's only temporary and therefore can be treated, controlled and prevented. There are treatments and cures available, and many of these especially those for temporary cases, can be as simple as lifestyle changes -- eating the right foods, learning to manage stress properly, and doing away with unhealthy, nasty habits that can aggravate the condition.

In most cases though, it's all a matter of attitude. Being bald should not be a cause of stigma. It does not make you less of a person or less masculine, less virile, and less attractive and appealing. In fact, a clean shaven head is becoming a popular trend among men these days, and there are certainly many bald men who have managed to make themselves look clean, elegant and suave despite their hair loss. Learn to come to terms with it. It's hair loss, yes, but not brain damage. It does not affect your core.